Should I train when I’m pregnant?

Should I train when I’m pregnant?

Should I train when I’m pregnant? Optimum Health

Women today are under even more pressure than
ever to maintain their fitness and especially
their figure through and after pregnancy.

 

This is often with complete disregard for
what is happening to the female body to grow
another life, birth it and then recover.

 

The simple answer to the question of whether
to train when pregnant is…”it depends”….

 

It depends on points such as:

  • the training you did before falling pregnant
  • how the pregnancy is progressing
  • how the Mum-to-be feels in terms of energy, nausea,
    etc
  • whether there are any pelvic or back issues to
    take into account

I do believe that enjoying movement whilst
pregnant has a whole host of benefits. This
is based on my own experience with my 2 boys,
and working with my pregnant and post-natal
clients.

 

At the very least, when coached correctly,
it:

  • helps maintain good circulation
  • preserves good alignment, avoiding overarching the
    lower back particularly in later stages of
    pregnancy
  • avoids undue aches and pains
  • prepares the pelvic floor for childbirth and
    post-natal recovery
  • ensures Mum is ready for carrying all that heavy equipment around that baby’s seem to require!

The pictures below are my client Amy,
training this last Monday….her due date.

 

Training when pregnant can avoid aches, support you through childbirth & prepare you for all that lifting with baby and all the accessories!

Training when pregnant can avoid aches, support you through childbirth & prepare you for all that lifting with baby and all the accessories!

I coached Amy well before she became pregnant
and we have worked together throughout this
pregnancy – always taking heed of how she
feels, how she’s moving and what she needs.

 

We have worked her “core and floor”
throughout, in safe positions for both Amy
and baby.

 

The “farmer’s walks” are actually a great way
of simulating carrying baby in his/her car
seat. Including this in Amy’s programme means
I’m confident she can do this whilst
maintaining spinal integrity, core engagement
and alignment.

 

Why is that important?

 

To avoid injury.

 

That post-natal period is an intense period
of recovery. I’m not just talking about 6
weeks here either. In the hazy blur of a
baby’s first days, weeks and months, Mum’s
need to lift, carry, bend and breastfeed.

 

All of these activities have strength,
flexibility and stability requirements. As
Mums we just get on and do them then sit down
on an evening and think “oooh that aches”.

 

Amy is physically prepared for all of that as
a result of the effort and commitment she has
put into her training over her entire
pregnancy.

 

As a coach, I am immensely proud of Amy and
excited for what’s to come.

 

The only thing we weren’t able to improve
on….was making it easier to put socks on at 9
months pregnant 😉

Stay strong, be sensible, have fun!

Stay strong, be sensible, have fun!